Trench 94, Hanford DOE Site

SSBN629-202

Trench 94, Hanford DOE Site

United States Department of Navy

After Decommissioning

On November 4, 1993, the USS Daniel Boone entered Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Drydock #4 with the USS Casimir Pulaski, USS Greenling, and USS John C. Calhoun. Metals were separated into bins and recycled or sold by the shipyard. Forward equipment was shutdown, tagged out, and turned over to the shipyard for dismantling. The engineering system process took longer. Detailed procedures were used to prepare for fuel rod removal. The nukes remained on watch until the end. After the crew departed on February 18, 1994, the recycling process accelerated forward. With the fuel roads gone, the reactor compartment was cut out, sealed, and shipped to a long-term storage location. The two remaining segments of the hull were cut into smaller pieces, shipped via rail car, and transformed into girders or razor blades. The final home for the Daniel Boone reactor compartment is trench 94 at Hanford Department of Energy Reservation. She is with her peers resting after a job well done.

Decomissioning Plaque

SSBN629-170

Decomissioning Plaque

Michael Eaquinta

Submarine Hull Thickness

SSBN629-87

Submarine Hull Thickness

Kirk Delph

M-140 Control Rod Railroad Shipping Container

SSBN629-562

M-140 Control Rod Railroad Shipping Container

Naval Reactors Report

Reactor Compartment Shuttled Down Columbia River

SSBN629-561

Reactor Compartment Shuttled Down Columbia River

Oregon State Report

Trench 94 Aerial Photo

SSBN629-568

Trench 94 Aerial Photo

Google Earth

Trench 94 has new residents.  Daniel Boone is third row from left, third down from top.

SSBN629-559

Trench 94 has new residents. Daniel Boone is third row from left, third down from top.

Brookings Institute

PSNS has been busy.  Heavy equipment provides height perspective.

SSBN629-560

PSNS has been busy. Heavy equipment provides height perspective.

Hanford Report